The two worked together several times a year on exchanging research and results before Makris joined the University of Texas at Dallas faculty as an associate professor in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science. That’s when they began to collaborate more frequently. “As we were demonstrating the new methods we were creating, we had to explore,” Makris says.

The basic premise of the research is that sampled test data from a few die locations on a wafer could determine whether all of the sites on the wafer are good or bad. This would make it possible to test far fewer die locations yet make an educated and accurate guess on the rest of the batch — dramatically reducing wafer test time. […]

Read the full article at the Texas Instruments Think.Innovate Blog.